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House & Home (128)

Furniture shopping via augmented reality

Furniture shopping via augmented reality

Startup Sayduck has launched an augmented reality app that allows users to visualise how furniture and home accessories would look in their homes. This idea solves the inherent problem of picturing how a piece of furniture, for instance, would look or fit in its intended environment – next to your existing home decor.

Why it matters

It’s a good example of how online shopping can connect with a real life experience. The app makes it easy and simple for users to  confirm if they are making the right purchase, removing any fear or worry that the object would not suit.
There are a lot of products that could benefit being visualised in  its intended environment. What other kind of brands or products could benefit from this type of technology and simplify purchase decisions?

Experience
Instant Gratification
Spain
House & Home

Shedding eco-friendly light on culture

Shedding eco-friendly light on culture

Panasonic launched its latest solar-powered LED balls at the Tokyo Hotaru Festival. The EVERLED light bulbs were meant to represent fireflies as well as pay homage to the Japanese tradition of floating candles on the water.
The spectacular event lit up the waterway with a sparkling radiance while promoting the brand’s ecofriendly product.

Why it matters

Culture is a powerful tool. Tapping into culture not only adds authenticity to ones brand, it can help celebrate it in unexpected yet relevant ways. How could you highlight your brand or product by tapping into local culture?

Israel
Authenticity
Enhancement
House & Home

Will wash for food

Will wash for food

Home cleaning company Scotch-Brite, struggling with appealing to a younger demographic, leveraged reward marketing and restaurant partnerships by inviting young urban consumers to test the sponges - in exchange for the meal they already ate.

Why it matters

Surprising jaded people is a challenge, with interception more believable than interruption. Scotch-Brite took a hard-to-win target and offered them something they’d actually use (a free meal), a surprise (they had planned to pay), coupled with an experience (washing dishes with friends) and product trial woven throughout. When we break in to a new demographic, how can we focus on intercepting and joining, rather than stalling and interrupting? Beyond gaming and competition, what are some tried and true bits of shared experience (everyone knows the price of skipping a check is washing dishes) we can use to help challenging customers open their eyes?

Experience
House & Home
United States
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