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Honda conveys efficiency at check out

Honda conveys efficiency at check out

With the launch of the new Honda CR-V, Honda decided to take a new approach to explaining the model’s fuel efficiency by placing a scale model on a continuously running grocery conveyor belt. Each car was mounted on the side of a grocery belt so that its wheels turned as the conveyor belt moved forward. On the divider bars, people would read the pay-off message, “With exceptional fuel economy, the CR-V keeps going.”

Why it matters

Showing is always better than telling, but explaining a benefit in a completely unexpected way makes it stick even more.  It helps to connect a product’s benefit to a more accessible concept (e.g. the never-stopping conveyor belt) to a more abstract idea of fuel efficiency.  What unforeseen analogous stories can you tell to help make your message stick?

Automotive
Experience
United States
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